Philosophy videos

Indexed dvd versions of Philosophers in conversation may be viewed in the library or online via Weblearn for University members.

The collection includes:

  • 19 video set of Conversations with Donald Davidson
  • 1 video of Conversations with Sir Peter Strawson
  • 7 video set of Conversations with Willard Quine
  • 3 video set of Jürgen Habermas in debate with Richard Rorty
  • 1 video set of Stanley Cavell at the APA, 93rd. Annual Meeting

(27 video collection published by Philosophy International & the LSE)

The Davidson Conversations

The Fara Interview

This personal interview, conducted by Rudolf Fara (London School of Economics) is presented in two parts. Part 1 is a biographical sketch from childhood, his Harvard career and ends with his military service during the Second World War. Part 2 picks up the biography from Davidson's discharge from the United States Navy in 1946 to the present. Attention is also paid the influences on Davidson's philosophical work, particularly that of W. V. Quine, and to providing an overview of his position.

Duration: 122 minutes ( University members may view online)

Donald Davidson, with Willard Quine, Sir Peter Strawson, and Martin Davies, Rudolf Fara co-chairs

This session explores the differences and similarities between Davidson, Quine, and Strawson, including their views on scepticism, on the relationship between metaphysics and philosophy of language, and on the attempts to reduce meaning to intention

duration: 1 hour and ten minutes (University members may view online)

Donald Davidson and Nancy Cartwright

Professor Cartwright considers Davidson’s views on causation and laws, and questions his argument for anomalous monism. They discuss Davidson’s conception of scientific laws and Cartwright’s belief that in physics there are no strict laws.

duration: 93 minutes (University members may view online)

Donald Davidson and Tim Crane

Davidson responds to Crane’s critique of his argument for anomalous monism

duration: 49 minutes (University members may view online)

Donald Davidson and Martin Davies

After Davidson places his celebrated paper "Mental Events" in its historical context, Davies offers an analysis of Davidson’s famous argument for anomalous monism. Davies then asks Davidson to show how the mental and physical realms differ. Does the real difference between the mental and physical realms stems from Davidson’s premise of the Anomalism of the Mental?

duration: 73 minutes (University members may view online)

Donald Davidson and Michael Dummett

Professor Michael Dummett engages Davidson in a close scrutiny about the relation between the concepts of meaning and truth. Davidson defends himself against the claim that he illegitimately takes the notion of truth for granted when giving a theory of meaning. They also discuss how we acquire the notion of truth and explore the relationship between truth and justification

duration: 110 minutes (University members may view online)

Donald Davidson and Stuart Hampshire

Davidson and Stuart Hampshire compare Davidson’s views with those of Spinoza, looking at conceptual schemes, mathematical versus empirical judgements and the place and status of laws of nature. They focus on the objective/subjective distinction and Davidson’s opposition to Nagel’s "view from nowhere".

duration: 65 minutes (University members may view online)

Donald Davidson and Jim Hopkins

Dr. Jim Hopkins joins Davidson to discuss his unified theory of interpretation, his most recent view about how we understand one another. In part 2, they discuss his views on the notion of irrationality, in particular his view of the "divided mind".

duration: 81 minutes (University members may view online)

Donald Davidson and Jennifer Hornsby

The discussion concentrates on actions and events. Davidson also explains the developments in his views on intention, from the time of "actions, reasons and causes" to the view stated in "intending". The session ends with the topic of reason explanation

duration: 74 minutes (University members may view online)

Donald Davidson and Michael Martin

An epistemological discussion, focussing on the problem of perception. Davidson explains his opposition to traditional justified-true-belief analyses of knowledge, and this is compared to his arguments in "A coherence theory of truth". The discussion then moves on to skepticism about the external world and to Davidson’s views on perceptual belief.

duration: 68 minutes (University members may view online)

Donald Davidson and John McDowell

A discussion of the constitutive ideal of rationality, including the difference between the mental and the physical, theories of truth, subjectivity and perceptual belief. A comparison is made between Davidson’s notion of holding–true and Quine’s notion of prompted assent. McDowell praises Davidson’s attack on the Cartesian conception of consciousness in "The myth of subjectivity".

duration: 101 minutes (University members may view online)

Donald Davidson and David Papineau

Professor Papineau surveys Davidson’s objections to various definitions of the concept of truth, beginning with Aristotle, and then Tarski, and finally disquotational theories of truth. The session concludes with Davidson’s views of coherence theories.
Duration: 56 minutes (University members may view online)

Donald Davidson and Willard Quine

Davidson and Quine discuss empiricism, with Davidson challenging Quine, and truth, where Quine poses the questions. Davidson: "We’re in agreement. It only took fifty years".

Duration: 76 minutes (University members may view online)

Donald Davidson and Richard Rorty

Rorty’s questions cover the three areas: the notion of truth, analytic philosophy and the concept of metaphor. Davidson invites Rorty to explain why he considers Davidson to be a pragmatist. Davidson agrees with this assessment.

duration: 68 minutes (University members may view online)

Donald Davidson and Mark Sainsbury

Davidson and Sainsbury discuss theories of truth and meaning and explore Davidson’s paper "A nice derangement of epitaphs". They also debate John Foster’s criticism of Davidson’s view of Tarski-style truth theories.

duration: 89 minutes (University members may view online)

The Smith Discussion

Barry Smith examines Davidson's views about the phenomenon of first person authority with respect to our mental states. The topics include what first person authority is, why and how it is that we enjoy it, and why it is consistent with Davidson's externalism about mental content.

duration: 53 minutes (University members may view online)

Donald Davidson and Barry Stroud

Stroud invites Davidson to explain what is wrong with scepticism about the external world.

duration: 74 minutes (University members may view online)

Donald Davidson and Peter Strawson, with Fraser McBride

A discussion about events and the logical form of action sentences. This is followed by a discussion between Davidson and Dr. Fraser McBride on the use of the "slingshot" argument.

duration: 53 minutes (University members may view online)

Donald Davidson and Gabriel Segal

A discussion on theories of meaning for natural languages. Davidson offers an appraisal of the state of Davidsonian semantics today.

duration: 61 minutes (University members may view online)

In Conversation: W.V. Quine

The Fara Interview:

W V Quine and Rudolf Fara

Recollections, formative influences, likes and dislikes.

Duration: 90 minutes (University members may view online)


The Dennett Panel:

WV Quine, Daniel Dennett, Martin Davies, Paul Horwich, Rudolf Fara

Overview of Quine’s doctrines. the areas considered include his early association with logical positivism, his notorious scepticism about meaning, his stance on epistemology and ontology, and his characterization of philosophy as a part of or continuous with science.

Duration: 126 minutes (University members may view online)

The Block Panel:

WV Quine, Ned Block, Martin Davies, Paul Horwich, Rudolf Fara

Quine is questioned about his views on the major topics in philosophy of mind, including linguistic behaviourism and cognitive science, mental causation and consciousness.

Duration: 111 minutes (University members may view online)

The Goldfarb Panel:

WV Quine with Warren Goldfarb, Martin Davies, Paul Horwich, Rudolf Fara

The programme begins with a discussion of Quine’s early career at Harvard, and considers his relationship with the logical positivists, most notably with Rudolf Carnap. This sets the stage for a discussion of Quine’s naturalism, and his naturalized epistemology. Questions are asked about the famous "two dogmas" and about his doctrines of extensionalism and ontological relativity.

Duration: 1 hour and 40 minutes (University members may view online)

The Fogelin panel:

W.V Quine and Robert Fogelin, with Martin Davies, Paul Horwich, Rudolf Fara

This session concentrates on Quine’s epistemology. He outlines his concept of "naturalized epistemology" and the "web of belief" and answers the usual sceptical challenges. The discussion moves on to the problem of induction and the status of epistemic norms, finishing with a defence of his naturalism, the belief that science is the only road to knowledge.

duration: 98 minutes (University members may view online)

The Boolos panel:

Willard Quine and George Boolos, with Martin Davies, Paul Horwich, Rudolf Fara

The discussion begins with the arguments of "Two dogmas of empiricism", progressing to Quine’s views on meaning and his indeterminacy of translation thesis. Quine gives his views on the differences between himself and Chomsky

duration: 2 hours (University members may view online)

The Dreben panel:

Willard Quine and Burton Dreben, with Martin Davies, Gerge Boolos, Rudolf Fara

Quine defends his critique of modality and explains his characterization of logic. He presents his ontological stance in detail and his view of the historical development of logic and of Tarski’s work on truth. Finally he offers his prescription of how much logic the philosopher should know.

duration: 90 minutes (University members may view online)

In conversation with Sir Peter Strawson

With Peter Strawson, Rudolf Fara, Maite Ezcurdia, Mark Sainsbury, Martin Davies, Nicholas Bunnin

The conversations are divided into five sections: Basic particulars; Persons; Conceptual scheme; Truth, reference and meaning; Recollections and prospects.

duration: 1 hour and five minutes (University members may view online)

 

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