Guidance for administrative staff

Administrative staff might:

  • Deposit work in ORA on behalf of an Oxford author 
  • Use ORA content on websites
  • Use ORA content within reports

Why is ORA useful for administrative staff?

1.     Copies of the full text of research can be found and accessed from a single location. It can include unpublished literature as well as published works

2.     The work is preserved for the long term and doesn’t disappear when a researcher leaves

3.     URLs to the online copy are persistent and do not disappear when a researcher leaves

4.     Data can be extracted from ORA for reports (CSV)

5.     ORA contains work by authors across the University. You can therefore find work by collaborators and cross-disciplinary work

6.     You can embed a live ORA search in a website (see the example of the Classics Faculty) so that a search always produces all the content tagged from the faculty or author.

7.     ORA will be able to be used as a conduit for delivering publications data to Symplectic (work in progress). Contact ORA staff if you’d like to find out more.

Depositing work in ORA on behalf of an Oxford author

Some authors ask administrative staff to deposit their works in ORA on their behalf. This is perfectly acceptable.You will need:

  • Details of the item you want to deposit in ORA (its title, where it was or is to be published (if appropriate), the date etc)
  • A copy of the paper on your computer
  • Permission of the author to deposit their work in ORA

You deposit the paper just as an author would, so if it's a journal article, you'll need to check out that you're allowed to deposit it in ORA (Romeo is a good source of help - or contact ORA@bodleian.ox.ac.uk if you are stuck). See the ORA deposit guides. Publishers vary on which version can be deposited, but as a rule of thumb, most will permit the final author submitted peer-reviewed version ie the author’s own which might be a MSWord document or similar. Check if there are any photos or other content that you might need permission for making available on the Internet (3rd party copyright)

Use ORA content or data in reports 

  • You can download ORA data in CSV format for Excel spreadsheets
  • Use the URL of items in ORA when citing work in reports.  

Use ORA content on websites

  • You can embed live ORA searches in to websites
  • If you have someone reasonably technical to hand, you can use ORA RSS/Atom feeds to update websites 
  • Or just use the URLs of items to link to work in ORA. These are persistent and so won't suffer from 'link rot'

Your subject librarian might be able to help if you have queries

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